Friday, August 15, 2008

Pituitary Cancer - What is it - How Do We Treat It | Information and Resources for Cancer

Pituitary Cancer - What is it - How Do We Treat It | Information and Resources for Cancer:

"Causes
Although the exact cause is unknown, a predisposition to Pituitary tumors may be inherited through an autosomal dominant trait. Chromophobe adenoma may be associated with production of corticotrophin, melanocyte stimulating hormone, growth hormone and prolactin. Basophil adenoma with excess corticotrophin production and consequently with Cushing’s syndrome. Eosinophil adenoma with excessive growth hormone production.

Signs and Symptoms
As pituitary tumors grow they replace normal glandular tissue and enlarge the tissue that house the pituitary gland (sella turcica). The resulting pressure on adjacent intracranial structures produces the following typical symptoms: frontal headaches, vision problems, personality changes or dementia, seizures, head tilting and dizziness, strabismus, nystagmus, nausea and vomiting, or any of the problems caused by the production of too many hormones such as infertility or loss of menstrual periods in women, abnormal growth, high blood pressure, heat or cold intolerance, and other skin and body changes."